Cardinal Ritter High School

Painting

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Course content in the Painting class will continue with learning experiences that include art history, aesthetics, art criticism and art production.  Students will create realistic and abstract paintings exploring a wide variety of media, tools and techniques.  The students will study and examine a variety of cultures, styles and time periods.  Students will use the art elements and principles to solve visual problems.  The art students will reflect on their art and the work of other artists.  Students in this course need to be self-motivated to work independently on assigned projects.  Students will use problem solving and critical thinking strategies to bring out their ideas for their projects.

Medical Terminology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Medical Terminology prepares students with language skills necessary for effective, independent use of health and medical reference materials.  It includes the study of health and medical abbreviations, symbols, and Greek and Latin word part meanings taught within the context of body systems.  This course builds skills in pronouncing, spelling, and defining new words encountered in verbal and written information.  Students have the opportunity to acquire skills in interpreting medical records and communications accurately and logically. Emphasis is on forming a foundation for a medical vocabulary including meaning, spelling, and pronunciation. Medical abbreviations, signs, and symbols are included.

Chinese II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Chinese II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Chinese language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write sentences and descriptions using characters. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and recognizing words and characters through stroke order and stroke count. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

French IV & Spanish IV

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level IV world language courses enable students to participate in classroom and extra-curricular activities related to the language studied, such as presentations to the student body and to parent groups and taking leadership roles in language clubs. Students are willing to participate in conversations with native and advanced non-native speakers, either in their community or in the school. This course also enables students to respond to factual and interpretive questions, interact in complex social situations, and express opinions and make judgments, give presentations on cultural topics including: (1) traditions, (2) historical and contemporary events, and (3) major historical and artistic figures. Students will also paraphrase or restate what someone else has said, read for comprehension from a variety of longer authentic materials, such as newspapers and magazine articles, novels, and essays, as well as make judgments about what is read.  They will write well-organized compositions on a given topic; and begin using the language creatively in writing simple poetry and prose.  Students are also aware of the relationship between various art forms in at least one major historical period, aware of the major literary, musical, and artistic periods and genres of at least one of the cultures in which the language is spoken, able to adjust speech appropriate to the situation and audience, and able to participate appropriately in a variety of specific circumstances which could include public meetings, attending concerts, and using public transportation.

French III & Spanish III

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level III world language courses provide instruction enabling students to understand and appreciate other cultures by comparing social behaviors and values of people using the languages being learned.  Students are willing to initiate and participate in discussions concerning these cultures. In addition, students are able to respond to  factual and interpretive questions and interact in a variety of social situations, such as expressing regrets, condolences, and complaints, and using more than rote memory formula phrases, read for comprehension from a variety of authentic materials, such as advertisements in newspapers and magazines, and cartoons and personal correspondence, read short literary selections of poetry, plays, and short stories, complete authentic forms and documents and take notes that require familiar vocabulary and structures. Students will also write paraphrases, summaries, and brief compositions, describe different aspects of the culture, using the world language where appropriate, including: (1) major historical events, (2) political structures, (3) value systems, (4) visual arts, (5) architecture, (6) literature, and (7) music; and seek help in a crisis situation and participate appropriately at special family occasions, such as birthdays, weddings, funerals, and anniversaries.  This honors course demands high expectation. The students are held to a collegiate standard of work and commitment. Instruction will be 95% in Spanish.  The course’s emphasis is on oral proficiency and contextualizing grammar concepts and learned vocabulary.

French II & Spanish II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level II world language courses enable students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to the language studied as well as to participate in conversations dealing with daily activities and personal interests. Students are able to ask questions regarding routine activities, participate in conversations on a variety of topics; relate a simple narrative about a personal experience or event, interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs, such as asking permission, asking for or responding to an offer of help, and expressing preferences pertaining to everyday life.  Students will understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over familiar topics, read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation, and write briefly in response to given situations, for example postcards, personal notes, phone messages, and directions, as well as write letters using culturally appropriate format and style.  Additionally, students become familiar with major geographical features, historical events, and political structures of the country or countries being studied. They also become familiar with different aspects of the culture, including the visual arts, architecture, literature and music, using the world language where appropriate and are able to extend and respond to hospitality as a host or a guest including being aware of time expectations, such as arriving for appointments and social engagements.

French I & Spanish I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level I world language courses provide instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak them. Students are able to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the cultures. Within this context, the course provides students with opportunities to respond to and give oral directions and commands and to make routine requests in the classroom and in public places, understand and use appropriate forms of address in courtesy expressions and be able to tell about daily routines and events, ask and answer simple questions and participate in brief guided conversations related to their needs and interests. Students will also read isolated words and phrases in a situational context, such as menus, signs, and schedules, comprehend brief written directions and information, read short narrative texts on simple topics, and write familiar words and phrases in appropriate contexts and respond in writing to various stimuli.  Additionally, students will learn about nonverbal communication, such as gestures and body language, about awareness of current events in the cultures, the major holidays and geographical features of the countries being studied, greeting and leave taking behaviors in a variety of social situations, the appropriate way to respond to introductions and use courtesy behaviors, and appropriate etiquette in a variety of social settings.

Spanish I & II

2 Semesters / 4 Credit(s)

This accelerated course will cover Spanish I in the first semester and Spanish II in the second semester (see course description for Spanish I and Spanish II). This class will
meet daily and is for motivated students because of the fast pace and rigor.  Students are immersed in the language as instruction will be 95% in Spanish.  There will be daily homework and quizzes and weekly chapter tests.  The course’s emphasis is on oral proficiency and contextualizing grammar concepts and learned vocabulary.

Latin IV

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Latin IV provides a context for integration of the continued development of language skills and cultural understanding with other content areas and the community beyond the classroom.  Students will continue to develop presentational skills by giving presentations on cultural topics and presenting culturally authentic material, such as plays. This course emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as guessing meaning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts and using elements of word formation to expand vocabulary and derive meaning. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to practice strategies that facilitate advanced oral and written communication, such as circumlocution. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of classical Roman culture through explaining factors that influence the practices, products, and perspectives of the target culture; reflecting on cultural practices of the target culture; and comparing systems of the target culture and the student’s own culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well as exploration of the use and influence of the Latin language and culture in the community beyond the classroom through activities such as the identification and evaluation of resources intended for those fluent in Latin.

Latin III

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Latin III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Latin language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending details of written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to initiate, sustain and close conversations, exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of classical Roman culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture, discussion of significant events in the target culture, and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding the Latin language and culture outside of the classroom.

Latin II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

The Latin II course provides opportunities for students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to Latin and to participate in conversations dealing with the influence of the classical world on modern culture.  Students are able to:  ask questions regarding activities, tell about daily routines and events, and relate a simple narrative about a personal experience or event.  Students will also be able to interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs, such as asking permission, asking for or responding to an offer to help, and expressing preferences pertaining to everyday life and understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over familiar topics. Students will read aloud, in Latin, with appropriate intonation and pronunciation, write short messages that respond to given situations and write letters using culturally appropriate format and style, and write simple guided texts on familiar topics.  As their study of Latin grammar continues and becomes more complex, students must memorize appropriate grammatical forms and vocabulary.

Latin I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

The Latin I course provides instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak or spoke them. Students have opportunities to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the culture(s) studied including mythology, government, and family life. Students are able to use simple conversational phrases; to translate individual sentences as well as paragraphs from Latin into English, to translate individual sentences from English into Latin, and to read Latin aloud in class.  Students are expected to memorize noun forms, verb forms, and vocabulary as part of their study of Latin grammar.  Students will also be aware of nonverbal communication through art and architecture and will demonstrate awareness of the contributions of important people.  Students will also become familiar with major holidays, geography, and history of the language and culture; and be able to recognize the contributions of the Latin language and culture studies to American society and the world.

Chinese I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Chinese I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Chinese language learning, and to various aspects of Chinese-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write simple sentences using characters. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as recognizing letters and sounds of familiar words and comprehending brief oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

Arabic II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Arabic II builds upon effective strategies for Arabic language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Arabic-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding the Arabic language

Arabic I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is an introduction to Arabic designed for students with no knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic.  It provides instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak them. Students are able to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the cultures.  Using a communicative/proficiency oriented approach, the students will begin to learn how to speak, read, and write in Modern Standard Arabic.  The course will begin with the alphabet, and then move gradually to learn various language skills like the sounds and their written form.  Students will learn basic everyday vocabulary and grammar and express themselves orally and in writing, with simple role-playing and dialogue.

Honors Theology 7-8

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Semester 1: Catholic Social Teaching: In addition to providing a foundation in Catholic Social Teaching, this semester will examine the Papal and Magisterial Documents that articulate the Social Doctrine. The semester will also delve into the philosophical arguments that provide the structure for the Church’s Social thought.
Semester 2:  Science & Religion / World Religions: The first half of this semester will examine the dynamic relationship between faith and reason, particularly as it is manifested in the dialogue between science and religion. Cosmology, evolutionary science, and bioethics will all be examined briefly. The second half of the semester will provide a brief introduction to the major religions of the world and give students an opportunity to evaluate their basic tenets and practices through the lens of Catholic theology.

Theology 7-8

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Semester 1: Catholic Social Teaching: This semester provides an analysis of the Church’s efforts to promote authentic Justice in the realm of culture, economics, and government. The semester will also provide students with the theological background necessary to conduct research on a contemporary social issue, culminating with the Senior Project.
Semester 2: Christian Vocations: An in-depth look at the primary Christian vocations of Marriage & Family, Priesthood, and Consecrated Life.   This semester will also introduce students to the process of discernment, formation, and fulfillment of the various states of life.

Honors Theology 5-6

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Semester 1: The History of the Church & the Writings of her Saints: This semester will trace the development of Christian Doctrine and Practice from the Apostolic Era through the Contemporary age by analyzing writings of Saints in each age.
Semester 2: Catholic Morality & Theology of the Body: In addition to investigating the Church’s moral teaching, this semester will also introduce students to Blessed Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body, a corpus of moral and theological teachings that address the proper understanding of human nature and sexuality.

Theology 5-6

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Semester 1: The Sacraments of the Church: This semester will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of the seven channels of grace instituted by Christ in order to bring the Church and her members to everlasting life.
Semester 2: Catholic Morality: A survey of the sources and expressions of Christian morality, including Sacred Scripture and Tradition. This semester will encourage students to discern the will of God and see the benefit of abiding in it.

Theology 3-4

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Semester 1: The Paschal Mystery: This semester closely examines the necessity and saving action of Christ’s Passion, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension.
Semester 2: The Church: A study of the Nature, Structure, and Mission of the Church. This semester will help students understand how the Church is organized, its functions, and how it carries out its ministry.

Theology 1-2

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Semester 1: Jesus Revealed in Sacred Scripture: An examination of the Bible that will helps students see how Jesus Christ is foretold in the Old Testament and his coming fulfilled in the New Testament.
Semester 2: God, the Blessed Trinity: A doctrinal exploration of the great mystery of the Christian faith and how God who is three-in one. In this semester, students will analyze how the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are active in the creation, salvation, and sanctification of the world.

Honors Economics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Honors Economics is designed for students who wish to receive a relatively in-depth, hands-on introduction to capitalism.  It covers a wide range of topics from basic economic concepts like scarcity and rational choice to international exchange rates and the Federal Reserve System.  Beyond the topics mentioned, areas of focus include supply and demand, monetarist and fiscal theory, and the stock market.  This course will move at a rapid pace, involve outside reading of business publications, and include a ten-week Stock Market Simulation.  Students will also get involved in online discussion threads regarding current economic situations.

Economics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course studies the principles and problems of the American economic system.  It covers topics of comparative economic systems, the role of the consumer, credit, saving and investing, and the stock market.  Students will get involved in online discussion threads regarding current economic situations.  The purpose is to give the student a better understanding of the economic processes of which they are a part.  This course is required for seniors.

AP United States Government & Politics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

AP U.S. Government and Politics is a rigorous college level course of study designed to give students an analytical perspective of government and politics in the United States. This course involves the in-depth study of the specific concepts used to interpret U.S. politics. In this course, students will gain a unique perspective of the various institutions and roles which make up our U.S. Government. This course will require an extensive amount of reading and writing, as well as critical thought.  Students taking this course will be required to take the AP Government exam.

United States Government

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course is an introduction to our United States government.  The students will study the three branches of government:  legislative, executive, and judicial.  The course also covers the creation of our Constitution and how it affects all aspects of life in the United States.  Individual participation in government is emphasized.  This course is required for seniors.

Current Problems, Issues, and Events

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Current Problems, Issues, and Events will provide opportunities for students to apply techniques of investigation and inquiry to the study of current events, problems, or issues likely to be historically significant.  By taking this course, students will be able to master such critical thinking skills as: recognize cause and effect relationships, recognize fallacies in reasoning and propaganda, synthesize knowledge into useful patterns, develop and test hypotheses, and generalize based on evidence.  The problems and issues that students study will have contemporary historical significance and will be studied from the viewpoint of history and other social science disciplines.

Sociology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Sociology is the study of collective/group behavior within and among societies.  Areas of focus include theoretical foundations of sociology, “adolescence” as a social concept, deviance and social control, and factors that affect group behavior.  Good written and oral communication skills are required, as this course involves many debate and research activities.  This course acts as an excellent preparation for college.

AP Psychology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course provides students the opportunity to explore psychology as the scientific study of mental processes and behavior.  Areas of study include the Scientific Method, Development, Cognition, Personality, Assessment and Mental Health, and the Socio-Cultural and Biological Bases of Behavior.  This course is offered more for students who think they may wish to pursue further study of psychology in college.  Students in this course are required to take the AP Psychology Exam.

Psychology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This class is an introduction to the study of human behavior.  The students will examine the physical, social, intellectual and emotional roots of human diversity.  They will study the causes, symptoms and treatments of psychological disorders and adjustment problems.  They will use statistical research methods to study behavior and students will apply knowledge of the subject to solve personal as well as community problems.

Honors United States History

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This is an advanced course, which serves the student who desires a more intense college preparatory experience.  This course builds upon the student’s knowledge of U.S. History.  Emphasis is placed on social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of the American way of life since the Civil War.  This course will require an extensive amount of reading and writing.  Students taking this course will also be required to participate in the Center for Civic Education’s: “We the People” Constitution competition, which is an in-depth study of the United States Constitution.

United States History

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course builds upon the student’s knowledge of U.S. History.  Emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, economic and political aspects of the American way of life since the Civil War.  Students learn to draw relationships between the past and today’s events.  This course is required for juniors.

AP World History

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

World History, Advanced Placement is a course that provides students with the content established by the College Board. The course will have a chronological frame from the periods 8000 B.C.E. to the present. AP World History focuses on five overarching themes: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment, Development and Interaction of Cultures, State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict, Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems, Development and Transformation of Social Structures.

World History and Civilization

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course covers the political, social and economic progress of world civilizations.  By comparing present problems with similar situations of the past, students gain a better understanding of the problems facing the world today.  Students are expected to practice skills and processes of historical thinking and inquiry that involve chronological thinking, comprehension, analysis and interpretation, research, issues-analysis, and decision-making.  They are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world.  Students are expected to examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present.  Finally, students are expected to apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills processes.

Geography and History of the World

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is designed to enable students to use geography to deepen their understanding of major global themes that have taken place in history.  Students will use the skills of the historian and the geographer to explore these global themes primarily in the period beginning in 1400 C.E. Students will be required to analyze, evaluate, and make predictions about major global developments.  This course is designed to nurture perceptive, responsible citizenship, encourage and support the development of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning, and to help prepare Indiana students for employment in the 21st Century.

AP Physics

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This physics course will provide the student the opportunity to develop an understanding of the nature of matter and its interactions and interdependencies.  The student will be able to observe and understand the fundamental concepts and principles concerning Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics.  The course is designed to help the students: (1) read, understand, and interpret physical information through words, graphs, and equations, (2) use mathematical reasoning to solve physical problems, and (3) perform experiments and interpret the results of observations.  Lectures, projects, presentations, technology, lab work, demonstrations, and/or investigations will be utilized in this course.  Students taking this course are required to take the AP Exam.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE.

Honors Physics

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Honors Physics is a course in which students synthesize the fundamental concepts and principles related to matter and energy, including mechanics, wave motion, heat, light, electricity, magnetism, atomic and subatomic physics.  Through regular laboratory study using such quantities as velocity, acceleration, force, energy, momentum, and charge, students (1) examine the nature and scope of physics, including its relationship to other sciences and its ability to describe phenomena using physical laws, (2) describe the history of physics and its role in the birth of technology, (3) explore the uses of its models, theories, and laws in various careers, and (4) investigate physics questions and problems related to personal needs and societal issues. It is recommended that students take this course prior to enrolling in Physics, Advanced Placement. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE.

AP Chemistry

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year.  Students will increase the depth of knowledge gained during Chemistry I and build on their laboratory skills through an intensive lab schedule.  Emphasis at this level will include properties and forces in solids, liquids, gases, and solutions, thermochemistry, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.  Lectures, research projects, technology, laboratory experiments, and field trips will be utilized in this course.  All students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Exam.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE.  Summer reading is required for this course.

Advanced Science: Organic Chemistry

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Organic Chemistry will offer an extensive look at the special nature of carbon chemistry.  Emphasis will be placed on structure, functional groups, nomenclature conformational analysis and stereochemistry, as well as some important classes of organic reactions.  An introduction to spectroscopy will also be presented.  Students enrolled in this course engage in an in-depth study of the application of science concepts, principles, and unifying themes that are unique to organic chemistry.  Lectures, technology, problem sets, laboratory experiments, research projects, and field trips will all be utilized in this course.

Honors Chemistry I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This first year chemistry course provides an in-depth study of chemistry at an accelerated rate.  It provides the student with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the nature and composition of matter and its chemical interactions through a variety of resources.  The student will engage in scientific inquiry, understand societal roles of science and technology and appreciate the unifying principles of chemistry.  The course will emphasize the history of chemistry, chemical bonding, nomenclature, classification of reactions, the behavior of gases, the nature of solutions and laboratory safety.  This class will also include topics not covered in Chemistry I such as an introduction to nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, thermochemistry, and organic chemistry.  Lectures, projects, presentations, technology, lab work, demonstrations and/or investigations will be utilized in this honors course. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Chemistry I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This first year chemistry course will provide the student with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the nature and composition of matter and its chemical interactions.  The student will be able to engage in scientific inquiry, understand societal roles of science and technology and appreciate the unifying principles of chemistry and organic chemistry.  The course will emphasize the history of chemistry, chemical bonding, nomenclature, classification of reactions, the behavior of gases, the nature of solutions and laboratory safety.  Lectures, projects, presentations, technology, lab work, demonstrations and/or investigations will be utilized in this course. A SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Integrated Chemistry-Physics

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This introductory course will help the student understand the fundamental concepts of matter and energy, mechanics, heat, magnetism, electricity, sound and light.  The course will also focus on the structures of matter, energy reactions, and society and energy use.  This course may be taken to prepare students for general chemistry.  Lectures, projects, presentations, technology and lab work will be utilized in this course.  A SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Earth & Space Science I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course will reflect the spectrum of Earth science including geology, astronomy, and meteorology.  This course is an entry level science course with no prerequisites.  Semesters are independent of each other.  The fall semester focuses on geology and climate change while the spring semester focuses on astronomy and meteorology.  Lectures, projects, presentations, technology, laboratory and scientific writing will be utilized in this course.  Topics addressed include: plate tectonics, the rock cycle, energy sources, history of the Earth, galaxies, our solar system, and weather.

Advanced Science: Ecology

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This is a science class involving an in-depth study of the relationship between organisms and their environment.  The class may make many field trips to the creek near Marian University.  Biotic and abiotic factors affecting life in and surrounding the creek will be studied.  The carbon, water, and nitrogen cycles will be studied along with energy flow through trophic levels.  A comprehensive lab report of the student’s data collection and conclusions will be presented at the end of the course.  Students will write three to four papers during the class as part of their in-depth studies.

AP Biology

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is an advanced study of the characteristics of life designed to be equivalent to a full year of biology taken during the first year of college by biology majors.  Emphasis will be placed on biological concerns, cytology, organic chemistry, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cellular division, molecular genetics, genetic inheritance patterns, evolution, ecology, and the diversity of organisms.  Lectures, research, laboratories, projects, technology, field trips and/or investigations will be utilized in this course.  Students taking this course are required to take the AP Exam. Summer reading is required for this course. For every 1 hour of class time, students should expect to spend 2 hours outside of class on course work.

Advanced Science: Human Anatomy and Physiology

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course provides for an in-depth investigation of comparative anatomy and physiology.  The first semester focuses on lecture while the second semester involves lengthy and detailed dissections.  All of the major organ systems will be studied.  Lectures, research, laboratories, dissection, projects, technology, and/or investigations will be utilized in this course.

Honors Biology I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is an accelerated and more in-depth study of biology.  A more advanced text is used in this class.  The material studied will come from a variety of sources.  The student will be able to engage in scientific inquiry, understand societal roles of science and technology and appreciate the unifying principles of biology.  Emphasis will be on biological cell structures and functions, biochemistry, cellular metabolisms, cell divisions, Mendelian and molecular genetics, evolution, protein synthesis, ecology, anatomy and physiology of plants and biological systems.  Lectures, laboratories, projects, field trips, technology and/or investigations will be utilized in this course.  Reading a scientific novel may be required during the year.

Biology I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This first year general biology course will reflect the entire spectrum of living things.  The student will be able to engage in scientific inquiry, understand societal roles of science and technology and appreciate the unifying principles of biology.  Emphasis will be on biological characteristics, methods and tools, chemical and physical organizations of life, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structures and functions, biochemistry, cellular metabolisms, cell divisions, genetics, protein synthesis, evolution, ecology, the biosphere and living biological tissues and organs.  Lectures, laboratories, projects, field trips, technology and/or investigations will be utilized in this course.

Elective Physical Education

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

For the competitive athlete or serious weight lifter.  Weight training and some aerobic conditioning are the primary focus of this course.  Students are expected to pass the President’s Fitness Test.  This course requires a strong work ethic.  Students may have no physical limitations.

Physical Education II

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Secondary Physical Education II emphasizes a personal commitment to lifetime activity and fitness for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction. This course provides students with opportunities to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness and to increase their knowledge of fitness concepts. It includes at least three different movement forms without repeating those offered in secondary Physical Education I. Movement forms may include: (1) health-related fitness activities (cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition), (2) aerobic exercise, (3) team sports, (4)individual and dual sports, (5) gymnastics, (6) outdoor pursuits, (7) self-defense, (8) aquatics, (9) dance, and (10) recreational games. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluations. This course will also include a discussion of related careers.

Physical Education I

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Secondary Physical Education I continues the emphasis on health-related fitness and developing the skills and habits necessary for a lifetime of activity. This program includes skill development and the application of rules and strategies of complex difficulty in at least three of the following different movement forms: (1) health-related fitness activities (cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition), (2) aerobic exercise, (3) team sports, (4) individual and dual sports, (5) gymnastics, (6) outdoor pursuits, (7) self-defense, (8) aquatics, (9) dance, and (10) recreational games. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluations.

Health and Wellness Education

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

High school health education provides the basis for continued methods of developing knowledge, concepts, skills, behaviors, and attitudes related to student health and well-being. This course includes the major content areas in a planned, sequential, comprehensive health education curriculum as expressed in the Indiana Health Education Proficiency Guide:  (1) Growth and Development; (2) Mental and Emotional Health; (3) Community and Environmental Health; (4) Nutrition; (5) Family Life Education; (6) Consumer Health; (7) Personal Health; (8) Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs Education; (9) Intentional and Unintentional Injury; and (10) Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Students are provided with opportunities to explore the effect of health behaviors on an individual’s quality of life. This course assists students in understanding that health is a lifetime commitment by analyzing individual risk factors and health decisions that promote health and prevent disease. Students are also encouraged to assume individual responsibility for becoming competent health consumers. A variety of instructional strategies, including technology, are used to further develop health literacy.

Music History & Appreciation: Music of the Beatles

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

The topic of the 2012 Music History class will be the Beatles and their contemporaries. Students taking this class receive instruction on the music of the Beatles along with other groups. These include the Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, Chicago, the Motown Experience and others. Individuals include Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Gram Parsons, Elton John, Brian Wilson and others, as well as John, Paul, George and Ringo post 1970. Activities include listening to recordings, studying social history, and utilizing critical thinking in studying lyrics.  Students will be exposed to the use of a recording equipment board to understand how the process works in various different time frames (60’s-2000’s). Pending administrative approval, a field trip is planned to visit the Motown Recording Studio in Detroit, MI. Student Power Point presentations are a requirement.

Intermediate Orchestra

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This class is for the student who wishes to continue to play a Stringed instrument in an orchestra ensemble (violin, viola, cello and string bass). Students will be required to obtain their own instrument.  You may contact the music department director for more information for an instrument. This is a year long class. Students must know how to read music, play music and perform music with at least 2 years instruction. Private lessons outside of the school are highly encouraged. This is a performance based curriculum. Grading is based on playing your instrument, keeping current on assignments and daily practice schedule outside of class. Time outside the normal school day will be required if performances are out of the school schedule. A limited number of public performances serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals set forth by the teacher. Students are required to participate in performances outside the school day that support and extend leaning in the classroom. Students will be responsible for an assigned school performance uniform and must see to its up-keep. Attendance at all performances and rehearsals outside of the normal class day is a requirement. Grades are performance based.

Beginning Orchestra

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This class is for the student who wishes to play a stringed instrument in an orchestra ensemble (violin, viola, cello and string bass). Students will be required to obtain their own instrument.  You may contact the music department director for more information for an instrument. This is a year long class. Students will be taught how to read music, play music and perform music. This is a performance based curriculum. Grading is based on playing your instrument, keeping current on assignments and daily practice schedule outside of class. Time outside the normal school day will be required if performances are out of the school schedule. A limited number of public performances serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals set forth by the teacher. Students are required to participate in performances outside the school day that support and extend leaning in the classroom. Rehearsal schedules also include one day after school a week.

Intermediate Chorus

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course provides students with opportunities to develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing.  Activities creating the development of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature that is appropriate in difficulty and range for the students.  This includes music performed at a Catholic Mass.  Chorus class provides instruction in creating, performing, listening to and analyzing work and critiquing in our own recorded music, in addition to focusing on the specific subject matter.  Students develop the ability to produce, arrange, write, and record a song of the class’s choosing.  They will understand and convey the composer’s intent in order to connect the performer to the audience.  A limited number of public performances will serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and music goals.  Students are required to participate in performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support and extend learning in the classroom.  This course includes a $30 fee for recording costs.   Students who wish to transfer into this course at semester will be required to audition with the Instructor.

Instrumental Ensemble (Drumline)

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of chamber ensemble and solo literature, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains.  Instruction is designed to enable students to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas.  Once students attain a certain level of musicianship, they will be allowed to participate in a more difficult schedule with pep band and or pep sessions.

Advanced Concert Band

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains.  Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop and build upon elements of musicianship including, but not limited to, tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music and studying historically significant styles of music literature.  In addition, students perform, with expression and technical accuracy, a large and varied repertoire of concert band literature that is developmentally appropriate.  Evaluation of music and music performances is included.  A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals.  Students are required to participate in performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support and extend learning in the classroom.  Advanced students will be held to a higher standard of technical ability, musicianship and leadership.  Students who want to take Honors Advanced Concert Band must have two years of Advanced Concert Band experience.

Intermediate Concert Band

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains.  Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop and build upon elements of musicianship including, but not limited to, tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, and analyzing music.  In addition, students perform, with expression and technical accuracy, a large and varied repertoire of concert band literature that is developmentally appropriate.  Evaluation of music and music performances is included.  A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support and extend learning in the classroom.

Beginning Concert Band

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is a beginning approach to learning a band instrument. No experience is required. Instruction is designed to develop skills in all affective domains.  Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including, but not limited to, tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music and studying historically significant styles of music literature.  Once students attain a certain level of musicianship, they will be allowed to participate in a more difficult schedule with pep band. Time outside of school will be scheduled for performances.  A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals.  Students are required to participate in performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support and extend learning in the classroom.

Finite Mathematics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course expands students’ mathematical reasoning and problem-solving skills as they cover topics such as mathematics of voting, weighted voting systems, fair division, apportionment, Euler circuits, Hamilton circuits, mathematics of networks, and game theory.  The course will encourage students to make mathematical connections from the classroom to the world after high school, while learning the importance of mathematics in everyday life.  This course is offered as an addition to Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry, not a replacement.  A SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Probability & Statistics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course introduces and examines the statistical topics that are applied during the decision-making process.  Topics include: descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference.  Techniques investigated include:  data collection through experiments or surveys, data organization, sampling theory and making inferences from samples.  Computers are used for data analysis and data presentation.  This course should not be taken as a replacement for Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry in a college preparatory course of study.  A SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Honors Probability & Statistics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. This course is required for students taking MAT 230 in the spring.  Students complete a rigorous study of the following concepts: describing patterns and departures from patterns, planning and conducting a statistical study, exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

AP Calculus

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics.  It covers both the theoretical basis for and applications of differentiation and integration.  Concepts and problems are approached graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally.  All students enrolled in this course will take the AP Calculus (AB) Exam.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Honors Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course covers the same topics as Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry listed above. Greater emphasis is placed on applications and developing the depth of understanding and skills necessary for success in AP Calculus.  This course is required for students who plan to take AP Calculus.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Trigonometry

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course continues the foundation concepts necessary for college level mathematics.  Topics studied include: relations and functions, polynomials, rational and algebraic functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, analytic geometry, data analysis, trigonometry in triangles, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, and polar coordinates.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Honors Algebra II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course expands and develops the topics learned in Honors Algebra I.  Content areas include the topics listed for Algebra II with greater emphasis on preparation for upper level mathematics content.  The course is required for students who plan to take AP Calculus, and it is recommended that this course be taken at the same time as Honors Geometry unless Honors Geometry was taken as a freshman.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Algebra II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course further develops the topics learned in Algebra I with extensive work on learning to graph equations and inequalities in the Cartesian coordinate system.  Topics include:  relations and functions, systems of equations and inequalities, conic sections, polynomials, algebraic fractions, logarithmic and exponential functions, sequences and series, and counting principles and probability.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Honors Geometry

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course covers the same topics as Geometry, but with greater emphasis on complex direct deductive proof and indirect proof and on utilization of more advanced algebraic techniques.  Content is extended to include topics such as analytic geometry and the interrelationships of inscribed polyhedra.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Geometry (1&2)

1 Semester / 2 Credit(s)

This Geometry course is designed for those students who did not receive a C- average or better in Geometry.  This course will meet everyday.

Geometry

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

The purpose of Geometry is to use logical thought processes to develop spatial skills.  Students work with figures in one, two- and three-dimensional Euclidean space. The interrelationships of the properties of figures are studied through visualization, using computer drawing programs and constructions, as well as through formal proof and algebraic applications. A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Honors Algebra I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

The same topics as in Algebra I are covered with more emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking skills in order to challenge the mathematically talented student.  Projects are incorporated into the lessons for the purpose of applying the mathematical concepts.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Algebra I (1&2)

1 Semester / 2 Credit(s)

This course is designed for those students who did not receive a B- average or better in Algebra I or did not pass the ISTEP+ Algebra I Graduation Exam.  This course will meet everyday.

Algebra I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Algebra I develops traditional principles such as:  solving equations and inequalities, performing operations with real numbers and polynomials, working with integer exponents and factoring polynomials, doing exercises with relations and functions, graphing linear equations and inequalities, graphing and algebraically solving linear systems, solving quadratic equations, and introducing topics from probability and statistics.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Algebra Enrichment

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Algebra Enrichment is a mathematics support course for Algebra I.  The course provides students with additional time to build the foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade-level appropriate courses.  The five critical areas of Algebra Enrichment align with the critical areas of Algebra I:  Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling.  However, whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra Enrichment combines standards from high school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades.  This course counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma only or as an Elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.  Algebra Enrichment is designed as a support course for Algebra I. As such, a student taking Algebra Enrichment should also be enrolled in Algebra I during the same academic year.
A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Basic Skills Development

2 Semesters / 1 Credit(s)

Basic Skills Development is a special class offered only to students enrolled in the Learning Support Center.  It is designed to work with those students who have an Individualized Education Plan or 504 on file with the school. Students taking the Basic Skills Development class have the opportunity to study, take tests and complete assignments under the guidance, assistance and supervision of the Special Education teacher.  Students are offered a peaceful and supportive environment in which they can focus on their studies.  Individual assistance is available and encouraged.  Students will learn study skills such as note taking strategies, graphic organizer use, and organizational skills.  An extra fee is required for students enrolled in this program.

College Entrance Preparation

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This class is designed to prepare students to take the SAT exam by learning time management skills and test-taking strategies specific to the SAT exam.  The class is co-taught by one math instructor and one English instructor who alternate their instruction each week.  Half of the class period consists of teacher-led instruction and practice, while the other half of the class period allows for more individual practice using online tutorials, practice quizzes, and worksheets.  Small homework assignments are given weekly, as well as quizzes and exams.  While the College Entrance Prep class is meant to primarily help students prepare for the SAT exam, instructors will also provide students with strategies for the ACT exam. 
A $50 fee will be collected at the start of the course.

Journalism

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Journalism is a study of the art of journalism and the profession of journalists.  This course includes the process involved in:  1) reporting and writing news stories, 2) the legal and social responsibilities involved in newspaper publications, and 3) the ethics of accurate and fair reporting. This course includes extensive reading of models of excellent journalistic techniques and evaluates and analyzes journalistic writing through discussions and critiques.  Photojournalism is also covered in this course.

Student Publications / Advanced Student Publications (Newspaper & Yearbook)

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course provides the study of and practice in gathering and analyzing information, interviewing, and note taking for the purpose of writing, editing, and publishing student publications.  This course includes instruction and practice in effective journalistic writing forms and techniques as well as layout, design, and photojournalism.  Representative examples of amateur and professional journalism are studied.  The concept of responsible journalism also is discussed.  Student Publications offers practical training in publishing the school newspaper and yearbook.  Students plan, publish, and conduct an advertising sales campaign for their school publications.  Some after school time is required, especially for photographers.

Theatre Arts

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Students enrolled in Theatre Arts will take on responsibilities associated with rehearsing and presenting a fully-mounted theatre production.  They will read and analyze plays to prepare for production, conceive and realize a design for a production, including set, lighting, sound and costumes, rehearse and perform roles in a production, and direct or serve as assistant director for a production.  These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, Although the course may meet during a regularly scheduled class period, the scope of activities may require additional time.  Consequently, the course may meet for a lengthened class period or outside of the school-day hours.

Theatre Produciton

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Students enrolled in Theatre Production will read and analyze plays and apply criteria to make informed judgments.  They will create scripts and theatre pieces, conceive scenic designs, and develop acting skills.  These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process and integrated studies.  Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre, critique theatrical productions, and recognize the responsibilities and the importance of individual theatre patrons in their community.  The nature of this course allows for two successive semesters (Theatre Production I and Theatre Production II) of instruction at this level, provided that defined standards are utilized.  Although the course may meet during a regularly scheduled class period, the scope of activities may require additional time.  Consequently, the course may meet for a lengthened class period or outside of the school-day hours.

Advanced Speech and Communication

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Speech

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Speech provides the study of and practice in the basic principles and techniques of effective oral communication.  This course includes instruction in adapting speech to different audiences and purposes.  Students have opportunities to make different types of oral presentations including: (1) viewpoint, (2) instructional, (3) demonstration, (4) informative, (5) persuasive, and (6) impromptu.  Students are given opportunities to express subject matter knowledge and content through creative, analytical, and expository writing, as well as reading a variety of literary genre related to course content and speaking assignments.  This course emphasizes research using technology and careful organization and preparation.  Students also practice and develop critical listening skills.

Etymology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Etymology provides instruction in the derivation of English words and word families from their Latin and Greek origins.  It also provides the connotative and denotative meaning of words in a variety of contexts.  Students study the origins and meanings of English words, including roots, suffixes, prefixes and reasons for language change.  This course introduces students to tools and resources for etymological study and encourages them to be curious about the English language.  The analytic study of word history and semantics is reinforced through a written and oral component that involves specific analyses of texts that require etymological sensitivity, and encourages students to exchange Anglo-Saxon vocabulary that derived from Latin or Greek.  As it enables students to increase their vocabularies, this course helps prepare students to perform well on the SAT.

Classical Literature

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Classical Literature surveys Greek and Roman literature, including great authors, such as Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Pluto, and Aristophanes. This course includes the study of a variety of literary genres including: (1) tragedy, (2) comedy, (3) epic, (4) lyric, (5) novel, and (6) oratory.  Possible themes include the transition from oral to literate cultures, the emergence of cities and empires, the use of mythology, and the rise and fall of democracy.  Influences of classical literary patterns, themes, and conventions on modern literature may also be explored.  Emphasis is placed on reading, oral discussion, and written discourse.

AP English Language & Composition

1 Semester / 2 Credit(s)

This course follows College Board Entrance Examination guidelines for advanced placement English and engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts.  Writing assignments will be frequent, including weekly in-class essays and periodic research papers.  Students will also be expected to participate fully in class discussions and make presentations.  Students should make use of technological resources in researching, in producing their papers, and in submitting assignments.  Students taking this course are required to take the AP Exam.  Summer reading and essay are required.  Students are also required to complete a year long Senior Project.

English 12

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

English 12 continues to refine a student’s ability and desire to learn and communicate about language and literature.  The emphasis on different cultural contexts is intensified in a focus on world literature.  Students learn to identify and communicate about the broad themes, trends, and cultural issues present in world literature.  The composition component of English 12 continues to provide students with opportunities to improve their writing through a variety of essays using MLA and APA documentation.  Students are required to read and study supplemental novels.  Summer reading and essay are required.  Students are also required to complete a year long Senior Project.

Honors English 11

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Designed for the advanced English student, this course covers all the material included in English 11.  Additionally, the course includes the study of drama, independent reading of classic novels, vocabulary, and intensive essay and research writing.  Students are also required to complete a Job Shadowing experience and written work.  Summer reading and essay are required.

English 11

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Through the integrated study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, English 11 students further develop their use of language as a tool for learning and thinking.  In English 11, students move from predominantly analyzing and using the elements of written language to making judgments based on those analyses.  English 11 also incorporates a literary canon, much of which is from a culture or time period different from that of the students – usually a survey of American Literature from different periods.  Composition in English 11 continues to refine students’ abilities to articulate sophisticated ideas in an organized manner.  Students are required to write a research paper using the guidelines found in the Modern Language Association [MLA] and American Psychological Association [APA] manuals.  Students are also required to complete a Job Shadowing experience and written work.  Summer reading and essay are required.

Honors English 10

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Designed for the advanced English student, this course covers all the material included in English 10 but also entails a much more in-depth approach to the class material at an accelerated pace. Additional readings in world literature, as well as critical writing, are emphasized.  Further research techniques are taught as students write their research papers.  Students are required to write a research paper using the guidelines found in the Modern Language Association (MLA) manual.   Supplemental novels will be read in this class.  Summer reading and essay are required.

English 10

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course reinforces and continues the activities and skills of English 9.  Beyond these, English 10 adds emphasis to a given canon of literature, usually American Literature, and increases focus on the self-conscious choice of comprehension and writing strategies.  Students use the basic modes of oral and written expression through the development of effective descriptive and narrative procedures, including focus and logical organization of ideas.  The formal study of grammar, usage, spelling, and language mechanics is integrated into the study of writing.  Students are required to write a research paper using the guidelines found in the Modern Language Association (MLA) manual.  Supplemental novels will be read in this class. Summer reading and essay are required.

Honors English 9

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is designed for the advanced English student and covers all material included in English 9.  The course also includes additional reading and an introduction to etymology.  Students will be expected to write lengthy papers, covering a variety of topics and purposes. Supplemental novels will be read in this class.  Summer reading and essay are required.

English 9

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Through the integrated study of language, literature, writing, and oral communication, English 9 students further develop their use of language as a tool for learning and thinking.  Students practice identifying, analyzing, and composing with different elements, structures, and genres of written language.  In this course, students will write for a variety of audiences and purposes while strengthening their skills in writing.  Student will receive instruction and practice in the writing process using technology.  This class emphasizes effective listening and speaking techniques and provides opportunities for students to integrate other reading and language arts skills as they learn to express ideas verbally.  Summer reading and essay are required.

Composition

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Composition provides students with an opportunity to learn to write by writing.  Students will have frequent opportunities to write for different audiences and purposes, using a process that includes: (1) prewriting, (2) drafting, (3) peer sharing, (4) revising (content, structure, or presentation), (5) editing (grammar, punctuation, spelling, usage), and (6) producing a final product.  For peer sharing, students receive specific training in providing constructive, substantive feedback, while role playing as members of the author’s target audience.  This is done for each essay.  Selected readings provide models of effective writing techniques and opportunities to evaluate and discuss the writings of others.  In addition to providing instruction in writing clear, coherent, and organized text, this course will teach strategies for collecting and transforming data for use in writing and using criteria to evaluate and revise writing.  Instruction in grammar, usage, and mechanics will be integrated with writing so that students develop a functional understanding of language and a common vocabulary for discussing writing.  Though not every piece of writing has to be put into final form, those that are should follow accepted conventions of language, style, mechanics, and format.  It is strongly recommended that computers be used to support writing instruction.  A final portfolio is required.

Peer Tutoring

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Peer Tutoring provides high school seniors with an organized exploratory experience to assist students in junior high and high school, through a helping relationship, with their studies and personal growth and development.  The course provides opportunities for the students taking the course to develop a basic understanding of individual differences and to explore career options in related fields.  Peer Tutoring experiences are preplanned by the teacher trainer and any cooperating teacher under whom the tutoring is to be provided.  The course provides a balance of class work relating to the development and of and use of: (1) listening skills, (2) communication skills, (3) facilitation skills, (4) decision-making skills, and (5) teaching strategies.

Cadet Teaching Experience

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This elective course provides students exploratory teaching experiences in grades kindergarten through grade 8.  This course provides a balance of class work relating to:  1) classroom organization, 2) classroom management, 3) the curriculum and instructional process, 4) observations of teaching, 5) instructional experiences. Cadet teaching students will work under the guidance of a teacher at the participating school, usually a West Deanery feeder school.  Evaluation is based upon the cadet teacher’s cooperation, day-to-day practical performance, class work and attendance.  Résumé and portfolio development and career related research is also provided to students.  Students will be responsible for securing a cadet teaching placement.  Transportation to the school is the student’s responsibility.  Students who are interested in working with children or pursuing a career in education would benefit from this course.

Career Exploration Internship

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This elective course provides students the opportunity to learn about themselves and a career interest area.  Students also gain an awareness of the type of occupational preparation or training needed for various occupations and careers in their field of interest.  Opportunities are provided to students to observe job situations and gain work skills through internships.  Evaluation is based upon the intern’s cooperation, day-to-day practical performance, class work and attendance.  Résumé development, portfolio, and career research is also provided to students.  Students are responsible for securing an internship placement.  Transportation to the job is the student’s responsibility.  Students interested in gaining work experience in their career interest would benefit from this course.

Housing and Interior Design Foundations

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Housing and Interior Design Foundations is an introductory course essential for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career within the housing, interior design, or furnishings industry. This course addresses the selection and planning of designed spaces to meet the needs, wants, values and lifestyles of individuals, families, clients, and communities. Housing decisions, resources and options will be explored including factors affecting housing choices and the types of housing available. Developmental influences on housing and interior environments will also be considered. Basic historical architectural styling and basic furniture styles will be explored as well as basic identification of the elements and principles of design. Design and space planning involves evaluating floor plans and reading construction documents while learning to create safe, functional, and aesthetic spaces. Presentation techniques will be practiced to thoroughly communicate design ideas. Visual arts concepts will be addressed. A project based approach will be utilized requiring higher-order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes as housing and interior design content is integrated into the design of interior spaces while meeting specific project criteria.

Child Development and Parenting

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Child Development is an introductory course for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from conception/prenatal through age 3. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and caregivers. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success integrates these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language arts proficiencies will be applied. Authentic applications such as introductory laboratory/field experiences with young children and/or service learning that build knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

Fashion and Textiles Foundation

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Fashion and Textiles Foundations is an introductory course for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry.  This course addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the fashion, textile, and apparel arena.  The course includes the study of personal, academic, and career success; careers in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry; factors influencing the merchandising and selection of fashion, textile, and apparel goods and their properties, design, and production; and consumer skills.  A project-based approach integrates instruction and laboratory experiences including application of the elements and principles of design; selection, production, alteration, repair, and maintenance of apparel and textile products; product research, development, and testing; and application of technical tools and equipment utilized in the industry. Visual arts concepts will be addressed. There will be a $30 fee for the year for materials that will be collected the first week of class.