Cardinal Ritter High School

Social Studies

Honors Economics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Honors Economics is designed for students who wish to receive a relatively in-depth, hands-on introduction to capitalism.  It covers a wide range of topics from basic economic concepts like scarcity and rational choice to international exchange rates and the Federal Reserve System.  Beyond the topics mentioned, areas of focus include supply and demand, monetarist and fiscal theory, and the stock market.  This course will move at a rapid pace, involve outside reading of business publications, and include a ten-week Stock Market Simulation.  Students will also get involved in online discussion threads regarding current economic situations.

Economics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course studies the principles and problems of the American economic system.  It covers topics of comparative economic systems, the role of the consumer, credit, saving and investing, and the stock market.  Students will get involved in online discussion threads regarding current economic situations.  The purpose is to give the student a better understanding of the economic processes of which they are a part.  This course is required for seniors.

AP United States Government & Politics

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

AP U.S. Government and Politics is a rigorous college level course of study designed to give students an analytical perspective of government and politics in the United States. This course involves the in-depth study of the specific concepts used to interpret U.S. politics. In this course, students will gain a unique perspective of the various institutions and roles which make up our U.S. Government. This course will require an extensive amount of reading and writing, as well as critical thought.  Students taking this course will be required to take the AP Government exam.

United States Government

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course is an introduction to our United States government.  The students will study the three branches of government:  legislative, executive, and judicial.  The course also covers the creation of our Constitution and how it affects all aspects of life in the United States.  Individual participation in government is emphasized.  This course is required for seniors.

Current Problems, Issues, and Events

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Current Problems, Issues, and Events will provide opportunities for students to apply techniques of investigation and inquiry to the study of current events, problems, or issues likely to be historically significant.  By taking this course, students will be able to master such critical thinking skills as: recognize cause and effect relationships, recognize fallacies in reasoning and propaganda, synthesize knowledge into useful patterns, develop and test hypotheses, and generalize based on evidence.  The problems and issues that students study will have contemporary historical significance and will be studied from the viewpoint of history and other social science disciplines.

Sociology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Sociology is the study of collective/group behavior within and among societies.  Areas of focus include theoretical foundations of sociology, “adolescence” as a social concept, deviance and social control, and factors that affect group behavior.  Good written and oral communication skills are required, as this course involves many debate and research activities.  This course acts as an excellent preparation for college.

AP Psychology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This course provides students the opportunity to explore psychology as the scientific study of mental processes and behavior.  Areas of study include the Scientific Method, Development, Cognition, Personality, Assessment and Mental Health, and the Socio-Cultural and Biological Bases of Behavior.  This course is offered more for students who think they may wish to pursue further study of psychology in college.  Students in this course are required to take the AP Psychology Exam.

Psychology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

This class is an introduction to the study of human behavior.  The students will examine the physical, social, intellectual and emotional roots of human diversity.  They will study the causes, symptoms and treatments of psychological disorders and adjustment problems.  They will use statistical research methods to study behavior and students will apply knowledge of the subject to solve personal as well as community problems.

Honors United States History

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This is an advanced course, which serves the student who desires a more intense college preparatory experience.  This course builds upon the student’s knowledge of U.S. History.  Emphasis is placed on social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of the American way of life since the Civil War.  This course will require an extensive amount of reading and writing.  Students taking this course will also be required to participate in the Center for Civic Education’s: “We the People” Constitution competition, which is an in-depth study of the United States Constitution.

United States History

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course builds upon the student’s knowledge of U.S. History.  Emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, economic and political aspects of the American way of life since the Civil War.  Students learn to draw relationships between the past and today’s events.  This course is required for juniors.

AP World History

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

World History, Advanced Placement is a course that provides students with the content established by the College Board. The course will have a chronological frame from the periods 8000 B.C.E. to the present. AP World History focuses on five overarching themes: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment, Development and Interaction of Cultures, State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict, Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems, Development and Transformation of Social Structures.

World History and Civilization

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course covers the political, social and economic progress of world civilizations.  By comparing present problems with similar situations of the past, students gain a better understanding of the problems facing the world today.  Students are expected to practice skills and processes of historical thinking and inquiry that involve chronological thinking, comprehension, analysis and interpretation, research, issues-analysis, and decision-making.  They are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world.  Students are expected to examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present.  Finally, students are expected to apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills processes.

Geography and History of the World

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is designed to enable students to use geography to deepen their understanding of major global themes that have taken place in history.  Students will use the skills of the historian and the geographer to explore these global themes primarily in the period beginning in 1400 C.E. Students will be required to analyze, evaluate, and make predictions about major global developments.  This course is designed to nurture perceptive, responsible citizenship, encourage and support the development of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning, and to help prepare Indiana students for employment in the 21st Century.

Elective Physical Education

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

For the competitive athlete or serious weight lifter.  Weight training and some aerobic conditioning are the primary focus of this course.  Students are expected to pass the President’s Fitness Test.  This course requires a strong work ethic.  Students may have no physical limitations.

Geometry (1&2)

1 Semester / 2 Credit(s)

This Geometry course is designed for those students who did not receive a C- average or better in Geometry.  This course will meet everyday.

Sociology

1 Semester / 1 Credit(s)

Sociology is the study of collective/group behavior within and among societies.  Areas of focus include theoretical foundations of sociology, “adolescence” as a social concept, deviance and social control, and factors that affect group behavior.  Good written and oral communication skills are required, as this course involves many debate and research activities.  This course acts as an excellent preparation for college.