Cardinal Ritter High School

World Languages

Chinese II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Chinese II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Chinese language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write sentences and descriptions using characters. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and recognizing words and characters through stroke order and stroke count. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

French IV & Spanish IV

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level IV world language courses enable students to participate in classroom and extra-curricular activities related to the language studied, such as presentations to the student body and to parent groups and taking leadership roles in language clubs. Students are willing to participate in conversations with native and advanced non-native speakers, either in their community or in the school. This course also enables students to respond to factual and interpretive questions, interact in complex social situations, and express opinions and make judgments, give presentations on cultural topics including: (1) traditions, (2) historical and contemporary events, and (3) major historical and artistic figures. Students will also paraphrase or restate what someone else has said, read for comprehension from a variety of longer authentic materials, such as newspapers and magazine articles, novels, and essays, as well as make judgments about what is read.  They will write well-organized compositions on a given topic; and begin using the language creatively in writing simple poetry and prose.  Students are also aware of the relationship between various art forms in at least one major historical period, aware of the major literary, musical, and artistic periods and genres of at least one of the cultures in which the language is spoken, able to adjust speech appropriate to the situation and audience, and able to participate appropriately in a variety of specific circumstances which could include public meetings, attending concerts, and using public transportation.

French III & Spanish III

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level III world language courses provide instruction enabling students to understand and appreciate other cultures by comparing social behaviors and values of people using the languages being learned.  Students are willing to initiate and participate in discussions concerning these cultures. In addition, students are able to respond to  factual and interpretive questions and interact in a variety of social situations, such as expressing regrets, condolences, and complaints, and using more than rote memory formula phrases, read for comprehension from a variety of authentic materials, such as advertisements in newspapers and magazines, and cartoons and personal correspondence, read short literary selections of poetry, plays, and short stories, complete authentic forms and documents and take notes that require familiar vocabulary and structures. Students will also write paraphrases, summaries, and brief compositions, describe different aspects of the culture, using the world language where appropriate, including: (1) major historical events, (2) political structures, (3) value systems, (4) visual arts, (5) architecture, (6) literature, and (7) music; and seek help in a crisis situation and participate appropriately at special family occasions, such as birthdays, weddings, funerals, and anniversaries.  This honors course demands high expectation. The students are held to a collegiate standard of work and commitment. Instruction will be 95% in Spanish.  The course’s emphasis is on oral proficiency and contextualizing grammar concepts and learned vocabulary.

French II & Spanish II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level II world language courses enable students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to the language studied as well as to participate in conversations dealing with daily activities and personal interests. Students are able to ask questions regarding routine activities, participate in conversations on a variety of topics; relate a simple narrative about a personal experience or event, interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs, such as asking permission, asking for or responding to an offer of help, and expressing preferences pertaining to everyday life.  Students will understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over familiar topics, read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation, and write briefly in response to given situations, for example postcards, personal notes, phone messages, and directions, as well as write letters using culturally appropriate format and style.  Additionally, students become familiar with major geographical features, historical events, and political structures of the country or countries being studied. They also become familiar with different aspects of the culture, including the visual arts, architecture, literature and music, using the world language where appropriate and are able to extend and respond to hospitality as a host or a guest including being aware of time expectations, such as arriving for appointments and social engagements.

French I & Spanish I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Level I world language courses provide instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak them. Students are able to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the cultures. Within this context, the course provides students with opportunities to respond to and give oral directions and commands and to make routine requests in the classroom and in public places, understand and use appropriate forms of address in courtesy expressions and be able to tell about daily routines and events, ask and answer simple questions and participate in brief guided conversations related to their needs and interests. Students will also read isolated words and phrases in a situational context, such as menus, signs, and schedules, comprehend brief written directions and information, read short narrative texts on simple topics, and write familiar words and phrases in appropriate contexts and respond in writing to various stimuli.  Additionally, students will learn about nonverbal communication, such as gestures and body language, about awareness of current events in the cultures, the major holidays and geographical features of the countries being studied, greeting and leave taking behaviors in a variety of social situations, the appropriate way to respond to introductions and use courtesy behaviors, and appropriate etiquette in a variety of social settings.

Spanish I & II

2 Semesters / 4 Credit(s)

This accelerated course will cover Spanish I in the first semester and Spanish II in the second semester (see course description for Spanish I and Spanish II). This class will
meet daily and is for motivated students because of the fast pace and rigor.  Students are immersed in the language as instruction will be 95% in Spanish.  There will be daily homework and quizzes and weekly chapter tests.  The course’s emphasis is on oral proficiency and contextualizing grammar concepts and learned vocabulary.

Latin IV

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Latin IV provides a context for integration of the continued development of language skills and cultural understanding with other content areas and the community beyond the classroom.  Students will continue to develop presentational skills by giving presentations on cultural topics and presenting culturally authentic material, such as plays. This course emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as guessing meaning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts and using elements of word formation to expand vocabulary and derive meaning. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to practice strategies that facilitate advanced oral and written communication, such as circumlocution. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of classical Roman culture through explaining factors that influence the practices, products, and perspectives of the target culture; reflecting on cultural practices of the target culture; and comparing systems of the target culture and the student’s own culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well as exploration of the use and influence of the Latin language and culture in the community beyond the classroom through activities such as the identification and evaluation of resources intended for those fluent in Latin.

Latin III

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Latin III, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Latin language learning by facilitating the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course emphasizes the continued development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using cognates, synonyms and antonyms to derive meaning from written and oral information, as well as comprehending details of written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting student-created material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Though interpersonal communication is not an explicit emphasis of this course, opportunities may be provided for students to initiate, sustain and close conversations, exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write cohesive information with greater detail. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of classical Roman culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and perspectives of the target culture, discussion of significant events in the target culture, and investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding the Latin language and culture outside of the classroom.

Latin II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

The Latin II course provides opportunities for students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to Latin and to participate in conversations dealing with the influence of the classical world on modern culture.  Students are able to:  ask questions regarding activities, tell about daily routines and events, and relate a simple narrative about a personal experience or event.  Students will also be able to interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs, such as asking permission, asking for or responding to an offer to help, and expressing preferences pertaining to everyday life and understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over familiar topics. Students will read aloud, in Latin, with appropriate intonation and pronunciation, write short messages that respond to given situations and write letters using culturally appropriate format and style, and write simple guided texts on familiar topics.  As their study of Latin grammar continues and becomes more complex, students must memorize appropriate grammatical forms and vocabulary.

Latin I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

The Latin I course provides instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak or spoke them. Students have opportunities to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the culture(s) studied including mythology, government, and family life. Students are able to use simple conversational phrases; to translate individual sentences as well as paragraphs from Latin into English, to translate individual sentences from English into Latin, and to read Latin aloud in class.  Students are expected to memorize noun forms, verb forms, and vocabulary as part of their study of Latin grammar.  Students will also be aware of nonverbal communication through art and architecture and will demonstrate awareness of the contributions of important people.  Students will also become familiar with major holidays, geography, and history of the language and culture; and be able to recognize the contributions of the Latin language and culture studies to American society and the world.

Chinese I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Chinese I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Chinese language learning, and to various aspects of Chinese-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write simple sentences using characters. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as recognizing letters and sounds of familiar words and comprehending brief oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese language and culture outside of the classroom.

Arabic II

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Arabic II builds upon effective strategies for Arabic language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Arabic-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding the Arabic language

Arabic I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is an introduction to Arabic designed for students with no knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic.  It provides instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak them. Students are able to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the cultures.  Using a communicative/proficiency oriented approach, the students will begin to learn how to speak, read, and write in Modern Standard Arabic.  The course will begin with the alphabet, and then move gradually to learn various language skills like the sounds and their written form.  Students will learn basic everyday vocabulary and grammar and express themselves orally and in writing, with simple role-playing and dialogue.

Geography and History of the World

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is designed to enable students to use geography to deepen their understanding of major global themes that have taken place in history.  Students will use the skills of the historian and the geographer to explore these global themes primarily in the period beginning in 1400 C.E. Students will be required to analyze, evaluate, and make predictions about major global developments.  This course is designed to nurture perceptive, responsible citizenship, encourage and support the development of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning, and to help prepare Indiana students for employment in the 21st Century.

Beginning Concert Band

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

This course is a beginning approach to learning a band instrument. No experience is required. Instruction is designed to develop skills in all affective domains.  Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including, but not limited to, tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music and studying historically significant styles of music literature.  Once students attain a certain level of musicianship, they will be allowed to participate in a more difficult schedule with pep band. Time outside of school will be scheduled for performances.  A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals.  Students are required to participate in performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support and extend learning in the classroom.

Algebra I

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Algebra I develops traditional principles such as:  solving equations and inequalities, performing operations with real numbers and polynomials, working with integer exponents and factoring polynomials, doing exercises with relations and functions, graphing linear equations and inequalities, graphing and algebraically solving linear systems, solving quadratic equations, and introducing topics from probability and statistics.  A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Algebra Enrichment

2 Semesters / 2 Credit(s)

Algebra Enrichment is a mathematics support course for Algebra I.  The course provides students with additional time to build the foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade-level appropriate courses.  The five critical areas of Algebra Enrichment align with the critical areas of Algebra I:  Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling.  However, whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra Enrichment combines standards from high school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades.  This course counts as a Mathematics Course for the General Diploma only or as an Elective for the Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas.  Algebra Enrichment is designed as a support course for Algebra I. As such, a student taking Algebra Enrichment should also be enrolled in Algebra I during the same academic year.
A GRAPHING CALCULATOR IS REQUIRED.

Arabic I

1 Semester / 2 Credit(s)

This course is an introduction to Arabic designed for students with no knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic.  It provides instruction enabling students to discuss the many reasons for learning languages and to develop an understanding of the people who speak them. Students are able to apply effective strategies for language learning and show a willingness to experience various aspects of the cultures.  Using a communicative/proficiency oriented approach, the students will begin to learn how to speak, read, and write in Modern Standard Arabic.  The course will begin with the alphabet, and then move gradually to learn various language skills like the sounds and their written form.  Students will learn basic everyday vocabulary and grammar and express themselves orally and in writing, with simple role-playing and dialogue.